Sunday, May 08, 2016

Happy Mothers Day 2016

video
Many celebrate Mother’s Day by showing their appreciation for the achievements and efforts of mothers and mother figures. It is annually observed on the second Sunday of May.

What Do People Do?
Many people appreciate their mothers or mother figures, which include stepmothers, relatives, guardians (eg. foster mothers), and close family friends. Some organizations have Mother’s Day patrons who work together with the media and general community to raise awareness on Mother’s Day events that aim to raise funds for charitable or non-profit causes.
Mother’s Day events and activities may include:
§ Organized walks or runs to raise money for causes such as breast cancer research.
§ Visits to the zoo, movies, or botanical gardens, or other places of interest.
§ Breakfasts, brunches, lunches, afternoon teas or dinners at restaurants, cafes, or at home.
§ Handmade gifts or cards being presented to mothers or mother figures.
§ Flowers, chocolates, clothing, gift vouchers and other gifts that are given to mothers or mother figures.
§ Mother’s Day poems being printed, broadcast, or presented to mothers and mother figures.
§ Mother’s Day stories being publicized in magazines, newspapers, radio, television or the internet.
Many families may also spend the day having a picnic in the park or the beach on Mother’s Day
 Symbols
Flowers, chocolates, and cards are popular gifts to symbolize one’s love and appreciation for their mother or mother figure. The carnation is a type of flower that is particularly symbolic of Mother’s Day for some people. Its importance as a Mother’s Day symbol is linked to Anna Jarvis, who is believed to have sent white carnations for a Mother’s Day service in West Virginia, in the United States, on May 10, 1908
Little Story
The origins of Mother's Day are attributed to different people. Many believe that two women, Julia Ward Howe and Anna Jarvis were important in establishing the tradition of Mother's Day in the United States. Other sources say that Juliet Calhoun Blakely initiated Mother’s Day in Albion, Michigan, in the late 1800s. Her sons paid tribute to her each year and urged others to honor their mothers.
Around 1870, Julia Ward Howe called for Mother's Day to be celebrated each year to encourage pacifism and disarmament amongst women. It continued to be held in Boston for about ten years under her sponsorship, but died out after that.
In 1907, Anna Jarvis held a private Mother's Day celebration in memory of her mother, Ann Jarvis, in Grafton, West Virginia. Ann Jarvis had organized "Mother's Day Work Clubs" to improve health and cleanliness in the area where she lived. Anna Jarvis launched a quest for Mother's Day to be more widely recognized. Her campaign was later financially supported by John Wanamaker, a clothing merchant from Philadelphia.
In 1908, she was instrumental in arranging a service in the Andrew's Methodist Episcopal Church in Grafton, West Virginia, which was attended by 407 children and their mothers. The church has now become the International Mother's Day Shrine. It is a tribute to all mothers and has been designated as a National Historic Landmark.
Mother's Day has become a day that focuses on generally recognizing mothers' and mother figures' roles. Mother's Day has also become an increasingly important event for businesses in recent years. This is particularly true of restaurants and businesses manufacturing and selling cards and gift items.

No comments: